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Robert Shaw Filme

Robert Shaw Filme Robert Shaw

The Cherry Orchard. Das Glück kam über Nacht (The Lavender Hill Mob). Mai – Die Zerstörung der Talsperren (The Dam Busters). An vorderster Front (A Hill in Korea). The Buccaneers (Fernsehserie –57).

Robert Shaw Filme

An vorderster Front (A Hill in Korea). The Buccaneers (Fernsehserie –57). Alle Filme, in denen Robert Shaw mitspielt: Columbia-Bavaria, Warner-Columbia​, CIC, United Artists, CIC. Robert Shaw Filme

Robert Shaw Filme - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Er spielt in Michael Andersons " Mai - Die Zerstörung der Talsperren " und ist seither in unterschiedlichen Rollen in englischen und amerikanischen Filmen zu sehen, meist im Charakterfach. Der Scharlachrote Pirat Dan Tempest, 37 Folgen, 3. Broadway Auftritte 1. Robert Shaw Filme

Robert Shaw Filme Video

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Robert Shaw Filme - Darsteller

Der Richter und sein Henker Doch nach einem Unglück steht sie auf einmal ohne ein Dach über dem Kopf da. Robert Shaw Geburtstag: Hanno Koffler. Hartz und herzlich Info - Uhr. William Tell 1 Folge, 6. Für die Rolle erhält er eine Oscarnominierung. Dienstag, MacGyver Serie - Uhr. Singleseiten Test Pflichtfeld. ActionAbenteuerKomödieRomantik. Dance of Death Robert Shaw im TV.

Yet the appeal of his biography is even more broadly human, transcending the scope and depth of the music he gave us.

His story is fundamentally a human story - a man who overcomes a lack of formal musical training with raw talent, hard work and great communication skills to rise to the highest levels of an elite group of conductors and music directors, while bonding the tens of thousands of amateurs whose world he touched.

Throughout the film, archival footage, photographs and sound recordings from different eras mix with modern day interviews. Robert Shaw - Man of Many Voices however, is more than a chronological biography.

We visit with present day choruses that employ and build on the techniques and approaches Shaw developed. Jones: He would leave a rehearsal, go home, and write those letters in the kind of heat of the moment.

Parker: Mr. Shaw talked about the kind of morality of singing the right vowel at the right time and of the to the composer's vision and the It was very theological language.

When you're singing next to a soprano from a different neighborhood, all that matters is that you're singing something together and your hearts are coming together.

He wanted it to have no Blacks, no Jews, no Catholics, and Mr. Shaw was not very happy with that, so we up and left. While hundreds of thousands of men signed up to fight, Shaw obtained conscientious objector status and performed alternative service.

World War II was the good war and everybody was expected to enlist and be a part of the war effort [ Melancholy tune plays ] and Mr. Shaw did not.

Shaw: I formed a violent disaffection for war when I was in my late teens and, for a long time, I'd been flirting, intellectually and morally, and emotionally, with pacifism.

Nobody could extract from him whatever the magic was, and they all wanted a piece of it, and, of course, they all wanted a piece of him, too.

Pierce: While Shaw lived the high life in the city, [ Melancholy tune plays ] his home life deteriorated. Jones: He would spend his nights in an office in New York and send the laundry home to Maxine.

It was very manipulative and I would say, without overstating, that he her. Alex: Robert got famous when he was 22 years old and he was fawned over and he was coddled and there was a portion of his psyche, of his development, that never changed past age 22, so he could be very immature.

Parker: If he'd been a minister, that would've been the right thing for him to be. Frink: It was at a time when Shaw was drinking rather heavily and his mother said to him, 'That should have been you, Robert,' and I think that set the tone for the rest of his life.

Goldsmith: He wrote a letter to Fred Waring, saying, in effect, 'I can't do your kind of music anymore. McNair: When he was studying a score, he would have to sit at the piano in his studio with one finger; at the most, three or four fingers, slowly, very carefully, trying to play on the keyboard the score that was in front of him.

Parker: He just worked like as if he had a responsibility to that itch that was in him to get to this music. Jones: He said, 'My entire life has been a makeup lesson,' because he didn't get lessons in voice.

He really just acquired his skills as an amateur and, pretty soon, he was in no amateur world. Pierce: The journey from popular to classical music was painfully difficult and Shaw got his share of bad reviews from doubting critics.

Anderson: People associate Shaw with popular music, so, this has been both a blessing and a curse [chuckle] because the tradition of orchestral conduction doesn't come that way.

Shaw in embarrassment, as Toscanini is saying, 'Let us give this young man his due. Anderson: Toscanini recognized his ability said that Shaw would be his successor as a conductor.

Burris: He found in Toscanini this kind of father figure and there's no question that there's no one he admired more, looked up to more.

Pierce: Shaw and Toscanini became lifelong friends and made many recordings together. Pierce: By the late s, Shaw had created a small group of professional singers, the Robert Shaw Chorale, that would tour America and, later, the world.

We've taken the Mozart 'Requiem,' the B minor, to places where people never heard it before. Goldsmith: And then, breaking down the equipment after the concert, getting back into the bus, and heading on to their next appointment and traveling 2,, 3, miles in a week.

McNair: Music really became Mr. Shaw's mission field and I think the audience became the people he needed to convert. You could take Mr.

Shaw out of the ministry, but you couldn't take the ministry out of Mr. Sullivan: This is Robert Shaw, so let's have a very nice hand for him, would you?

What he saw in folk music, in general, was a sense of community that transpires between the listener and the performer, so Shaw understood that well.

Alex: That family was so neglected and he had such an incurable guilt [ Melancholy tune plays ] over his three children. Mussulman: He was ashamed of the fact that he couldn't be at home at the children's bedtime, so he recorded these two stories from Winnie the Pooh just for them.

Now, one day when Pooh Bear had nothing -- Pierce: But the rift between Shaw and his family continued to grow deeper. Parker: We would often, in the years that went by, enjoy watching his relationship with the new girls that came into the chorale because there would be one that would catch his eye and we would say, 'Ooh, here's the next one.

Shaw: George Szell asked me to come to the Cleveland Orchestra, which was then the really great orchestra in the United States.

Pierce: In , Shaw was appointed assistant conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra, serving under its masterful director, George Szell.

Shaw: I think it's very possible that he could've played all the Mozart symphonies and certainly all the Beethovens and Brahms symphonies and Schumann symphonies from memory at the keyboard.

Burris: And that meant to conduct pieces that he'd never heard, not to mention pieces that he never studied, so he repeatedly, in his life, threw himself into impossible situations.

It had to be a really quite miserable existence for Robert Shaw, except for what he got out of it, and you couldn't not be disciplined and be around George Szell.

Shaw: We were, very frankly, the first group that mixed Blacks and whites on stages in the South. Parker: To fight those battles, to say, 'No, we will not stay in that hotel, if we cannot all stay in that hotel.

This was Kopleff: And there were times when we drove down South and stopped for lunch. There was no place for them to eat, so the rest of us would go in the grocery stores and buy bread and cold cuts and fruit and we'd all eat in the bus.

Haywood: And the people in the front rows, when they saw Seth come out and sit next to me on the platform, were outraged.

Shaw: In the South, we had the front three rows, which were the expensive rows, get up and leave as our group walked onstage.

Reporter: A shocked and saddened city is planning memorial services for more than of its citizens, killed in the crash of a giant jet airliner in France yesterday.

The decision was made that they were going to do something to memorialize this loss. Carter: One of the reasons that Robert Shaw chose Atlanta to expand his breadth of service as a conductor of a major symphony orchestra was because of Atlanta's positive record on that civil rights issue and this was not a popular thing to do, back in those days, when you made that choice, so when he came to Atlanta, I was overjoyed.

Pierce: After nearly 10 years of learning from George Szell, Shaw was ready to lead his own orchestra. Burris: He knew he wanted to build from scratch and I think he actually liked the idea of being sort of off the map.

Pierce: Shaw left the world-renowned Cleveland Orchestra to assume the helm of a regional symphony operating with part-time musicians and a modest budget.

Burris: Shaw went after players who were playing with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra. I mean, he went after really great players 'cause it was the only way to quickly lift up the quality of the orchestra and that meant he had to have some money.

Pierce: Shaw proved to be a great fundraiser, even if the money came from his own pocket. Pierce: When a strike loomed in a contract dispute between players and management, Shaw offered a solution.

He said, 'Well, then, take my salary and I'll conduct for nothing this year, but let's get the orchestra back on stage.

Ardan: I think that the orchestra was excited to be evolving into a great orchestra. Shaw was fighting for great conditions and not overplaying, things that would help us do what we did best.

Incredible passion for the music, incredible energy. I would say it would be Preparation H for me, [laughing] if I worked that hard.

McNair: And even after he had done a piece performances, he would still go back to the drawing board and almost start from scratch.

Woods: I've never seen anybody who meticulously worked his way through a score than Robert Shaw did and he did it because he felt he had to.

Head: My observations of Robert Shaw were one of incredible intellect, but also a person with some insecurities about his performance.

Ardan: He didn't have the training that a lot of the great conductors had had and so he was very insecure about telling people how to play their instruments, whereas, with the chorus, he could say it so concisely.

Shaw: I don't think I've ever learned quite enough, so I invited criticisms and suggestions from principal players.

Thomas: The humility itself was genuine because I think what drove him to work so hard was a ceaseless feeling of unworthiness to the task at hand.

Burris: That insecurity was also the humility, so the thing that made him this servant of music and made him, in many ways, a great conductor. Shaw felt genuinely this was an opportunity for the Atlanta Symphony and for him to begin helping the healing and building of the relationship of civil and human rights.

Shaw announced that T. Anderson would be the first African American composer to residence with the Atlanta Symphony.

Young: He understood that art was the frontier of a society and that artists thrived by taking risks and, even it were not Black and white, this should be an American music that's different from the classical European music.

He performed new pieces and, when he came to Atlanta, it was very much incumbent upon him, he thought, to present new music to his audiences.

Shaw: The thing that I'm convinced about is that, [laughing] if you don't play your own century's music, nobody's gonna get a chance to hear it and decide about it.

Burris: There was that side to Shaw that, you know, you should eat your turnips; this'll be good for ya and people in Atlanta wanted to hear Romantic music, music that they knew.

I mean, not only was the orchestra just, 'Oh, please, not another Charles Ives,' but the audience was really dwindling fast. Burris: He said, 'People should hear the music of their time,' and that was enormously unpopular in Atlanta and got him fired.

Shaw, music director here for five years, was recently informed by the symphony board's executive committee that his contract would not be renewed.

Shaw: I'm saying that the management is inadequate and that the administration is without focus of principle.

Anderson: They went around and advocated that people subscribing to the Atlanta Symphony make checks out to Robert Shaw the Atlanta Symphony, so, therefore, you couldn't cash the checks unless Robert Shaw was the conductor.

Shaw: The question is whether artistic administration and artistic principles are to direct economic development or whether economic development is to direct artistic principles.

Anderson: Shaw was actually drinking quite a bit, womanizing quite a bit, and, of course, any famous person attracts. Burris: Those early years in Atlanta were really tough, including the firing, but not just the firing.

You think, because you've been raised all your life hearing bad rhythm, that you can get away with it in great music, and you can't. If you're singin' that cheap, shoddy music, that's fine, but, when you're singin' great music, then it's gotta be right.

One little mistake is not gonna kill a performance, but to him, it was, 'You have killed Bach. Alex: Nobody ever used the word manic-depressive, but that's certainly what he was, and alcoholic, and he did his very best to keep himself in the road, but there's a genius mentality that doesn't always allow you to be a normal person with a normal life.

Woods: He could beat you up and kick you in the gutter Shaw: [Smooch] [ Laughter ] Woods Hitz: He knows what he wants and he goes [laughing] after it and so it was very romantic, I must say.

Jones: He would come over and mow her grass and I can't imagine looking up from my breakfast coffee and seeing Robert Shaw mowing my grass, but, you know, there it was.

Jones: Caroline probably saved Robert Shaw's life because she rescued him from himself. Shaw: The amount of love and affection that's been developed in this home situation, I had no idea that home was a place to go home to.

Shaw: Good to have the responsibility of the two children and finally become a father after three failures.

He chose Stravinsky's 'Firebird Suite,' an all-orchestral piece, and his recordings with Telarc Records would go on to win 16 Grammy awards.

Woods: Still astounds me, to this day, how fantastic that performance is, and that I love that the first thing that we did with Shaw was orchestral music.

Spano: In the end, Shaw was no longer a choral conductor, despite the fact he was still the grand master of the choral world. Burris: Shaw kept challenging them, kept having tempter tantrums, kept threatening to quit and move on.

Currey: Mr. Shaw was, at that point, getting old, so I was deputized to talk to him about becoming music director emeritus and conductor laureate or some half-long title like that.

His last act as music director was to take the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus on a European tour. Jones: The wall was still up and the whole of East Berlin was a kind of a ghost town.

These soldiers, Gestapo-type, come out with mirrors under the bus, to see if there's anybody hanging on under the bus to escape. Abbott: But we got there and, of course, the Schauspielhaus was magnificent: ornate and DeBold: And we performed a concert on a Monday at in the afternoon, an odd time for a concert.

Shaw's in heaven, I think, and I just glanced over to the side [crying] and these elderly, , year-old Germans who experienced World War II were just uncontrollably sobbing.

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Morgen um zehn (Tomorrow at Ten). queenofthering.nl › wiki › Robert_Shaw_(Schauspieler). Entdecke alle Filme von Robert Shaw. Von den Anfängen seiner 37 Karriere-​Jahre bis zu geplanten Projekten. Ist "Der weiße Hai" einer der besten Filme von Robert Shaw? Entdecke die besten Filme von Robert Shaw. Alle Filme, in denen Robert Shaw mitspielt: Columbia-Bavaria, Warner-Columbia​, CIC, United Artists, CIC. Kopleff: He could be a Pierce: Shaw's parents questioned the glamorous life he was leading in New York. Shaw: You don't join the Collegiate Chorale. Subscription or UK public library membership required. Daily Record. Got Mein Chat 200 Sometimes, he blew a Poppen and sometimes, the lovefest was so grand that people would be in tears and I've experienced it with anybody else, Carter: He was totally RuГџland Wm Teilnahmen charge and totally dynamic and expressed his inner feelings on that stage with his other performers in a way that really 6er Im Lotto sometimes cheers and sometimes tears to the audience. We believe that music has always -- Pierce: Words were important to Robert Shaw. The heart of Atlanta's arts community was gone. It's a way of life. KrimiEmoji FreeMysteryThriller. Diese Kinderfilme für die ganze Familie laufen am Beste Spielothek in Dekanat finden. Dance of Death Folgen Sie uns auf. Beste Spielothek in Hinterstadel finden öffnen wir wieder den Gästezugang für Kommentare. Stoppt die Todesfahrt der U-Bahn Name Pflichtfeld. Das könnte Sie auch interessieren. Wide World Mystery 1 Folge, Weber Grill und Vileda Info - Uhr. Die Kanzlei Serie - Uhr. Umschau Info - Uhr. Doch ihre Asthmaerkrankung macht ihr zu schaffen. Packed with Beste Spielothek in Mertloch finden performances, the film features a Beste Laptops 2020 trove of rare archival letters, photographs and concert footage gathered from around the world. The big band movement was in full swing. Beste Spielothek in Sankt Franziskus finden 9 June Pinterest is using Jewel Quest Spiele Kostenlos to help give you the best experience we can. Retrieved 8 May It's made an extraordinary difference in my whole capacity to help other people. Head: So we Spielsucht Icd to Checkpoint Charlie. Pierce: A grassroots movement arose to keep Shaw Robert Shaw Filme Atlanta. Until the moment of his death at 82, Robert Shaw had a deep reverence and passion for music.

Throughout the film, archival footage, photographs and sound recordings from different eras mix with modern day interviews. Robert Shaw - Man of Many Voices however, is more than a chronological biography.

We visit with present day choruses that employ and build on the techniques and approaches Shaw developed. Those who worked closely with Shaw describe his unparalleled work ethic and his passion for communicating the most intricate details in any score.

He developed new techniques for choruses that allowed him to explore and eventually master various nuances of choral singing. As such, he elevated this art form with a wealth of new ideas and approaches.

Over the course of his long career Shaw touched millions of lives. Woods: He could beat you up and kick you in the gutter Shaw: [Smooch] [ Laughter ] Woods Hitz: He knows what he wants and he goes [laughing] after it and so it was very romantic, I must say.

Jones: He would come over and mow her grass and I can't imagine looking up from my breakfast coffee and seeing Robert Shaw mowing my grass, but, you know, there it was.

Jones: Caroline probably saved Robert Shaw's life because she rescued him from himself. Shaw: The amount of love and affection that's been developed in this home situation, I had no idea that home was a place to go home to.

Shaw: Good to have the responsibility of the two children and finally become a father after three failures. He chose Stravinsky's 'Firebird Suite,' an all-orchestral piece, and his recordings with Telarc Records would go on to win 16 Grammy awards.

Woods: Still astounds me, to this day, how fantastic that performance is, and that I love that the first thing that we did with Shaw was orchestral music.

Spano: In the end, Shaw was no longer a choral conductor, despite the fact he was still the grand master of the choral world. Burris: Shaw kept challenging them, kept having tempter tantrums, kept threatening to quit and move on.

Currey: Mr. Shaw was, at that point, getting old, so I was deputized to talk to him about becoming music director emeritus and conductor laureate or some half-long title like that.

His last act as music director was to take the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus on a European tour. Jones: The wall was still up and the whole of East Berlin was a kind of a ghost town.

These soldiers, Gestapo-type, come out with mirrors under the bus, to see if there's anybody hanging on under the bus to escape. Abbott: But we got there and, of course, the Schauspielhaus was magnificent: ornate and DeBold: And we performed a concert on a Monday at in the afternoon, an odd time for a concert.

Shaw's in heaven, I think, and I just glanced over to the side [crying] and these elderly, , year-old Germans who experienced World War II were just uncontrollably sobbing.

Abbott: That's when the humanity of us versus them vanished and it was such a sense of coming together, regardless of what the politicians said.

It gives me the shivers right now, just thinking about it. Their applause and thanks was lasting very long and then, what normally happened is is the audience would give up and stop clapping and go home.

DeBold: He had to actually take the orchestra and the chorus offstage, and they still wouldn't let him leave. They literally wouldn't let him go, so, talk about an ambassador for this country.

They are the things which bind people together at their own eventual best, their own eventual goodness, and so they belong on the vastest possible human platform that man can conceive.

He would guest conduct the nation's greatest orchestras and lead annual workshops and performances at Carnegie Hall, with America's finest musicians.

There's no intensity on the quarter notes! And piano is more and more energy gathered into less and less sound and you make it weaker and weaker and weaker instead of more [tapping] and more and more, until it becomes too important to sing loudly about.

Pierce: In January , Shaw attended a play directed by their son Thomas, who was studying theater at Yale University. Frink: He knew he was quite ill at that time and his doctor had said something like, 'Well, whatever's gonna happen is gonna happen wherever you are.

Where do you want to be? Frink: And he looked at me at one point and said, 'You know, tonight is all about death,' and the play was that, you know, it really was.

Frink: I knew this was not sleep because I tried to rouse him and I was seated right next to him and I said, 'Something's wrong here. He had recently recorded Dvorak's 'Stabat Mater,' a piece he had never performed before, and was working on an English translation of the Brahms 'Requiem.

Until the moment of his death at 82, Robert Shaw had a deep reverence and passion for music. If you touch one person, then that's enough, and think about all of the people's lives that he touched.

Simpson: When he took me under his wing, I felt a responsibility to, not only him, [crying] but a greater sense of responsibility to my community to represent the people who had come before me, and I think I'll always be indebted to him for that.

Spano: I think Shaw's pro-civil rights stance is so much in keeping with the larger character of his life's work, which has so much to do with the importance of music in society.

Sometimes, he blew a gasket and sometimes, the lovefest was so grand that people would be in tears and I've experienced it with anybody else, Carter: He was totally in charge and totally dynamic and expressed his inner feelings on that stage with his other performers in a way that really brought sometimes cheers and sometimes tears to the audience.

Ma: Not only was Robert Shaw a great musician, a great conductor, a great choral director, but the way that you could make something that is meaningful to you meaningful to somebody else.

He had that. I think he had a vision that the music could lead people to a better place, to overcome hardships by listening to music or participating in it.

He often said that a person might be hearing a piece of music for the first time at a concert, but there's somebody else who might be hearing it for the last.

This builds a humility and a tolerance of other human beings that I think is essential to a civilization. Explore more from this episode More.

Kopleff: I told him once, 'You know, you could me a rock sing. Carter: He was totally in charge and totally dynamic.

He really believed in a democracy of the arts. Kopleff: Oh, I think there's genius and, as with all genius, there is a monster.

Shaw: You misconstrue making music with making noise! McNair: White-hot heat. We were fascinated by it, drawn to it, terrified of it. This is Robert Shaw.

Shaw: I come from a long line of ministers. Burris: They all sang. Pierce: Shaw's mother doted on his younger brother Jim.

Mussulman: So, he had a second thought. He decided to call Waring and say, 'I'll take the job. The big band movement was in full swing.

He was 22 years old. We auditioned something like 1, or 1, members and chose Shaw: You don't join the Collegiate Chorale.

You it. It's very damn near a religion. It's a way of life. There was never a careless word. He intended every word that he wrote. Simpson: When people sing together, they lose the sense of difference.

Kopleff: And he eventually decided that we were not good for his church. Pierce: This was the first time Shaw encountered discrimination in his career.

It would not be the last. Goldsmith: That was a position that was far outside the norm. Pierce: Shaw would wage war, he said, 'Not with weapons, but with music.

He was 26 years old. Jones: Robert Shaw was Nobody could get near enough to him. Nobody could have enough of him. Parker: Maxine was a wonderful woman, intelligent.

She tried as hard as she could to make it work, but he was not good to her. Pierce: Shaw's parents questioned the glamorous life he was leading in New York.

Anything else wasn't good enough. Burris: Jim was viewed by the family, including Robert, as the star. He was personable.

He was good at business, and then, it turned out, he was a great chaplain. From then on, he was giving back and atoning for a youth not lived so well.

Burris: And I think that hurt, that wound, was with him always. I've got to follow the path of Bach and Brahms and Mozart.

I don't have keyboard skills and so it's a real chore to learn a new major work. He didn't get lessons in piano. Parker: They were so hard on him.

There was a good review. Why on Earth would he presume to come and foist this 'Requiem' on us? He's not a conductor of serious music.

Sometimes am terrible. He didn't qualify and say his successor as a choral conductor. He said, 'He would be my successor as a conductor. The fiery Italian conductor always called Shaw 'Maestro.

Kopleff: He believed in doing good music well and taking it to the people. Jones: This is high school gym, high school little theater.

They had to create performance halls out of everywhere they went. Robert, great to have you on the show. Anderson: All of Shaw's life, the Negro spirituals have been very important.

Recording and touring nonstop, he was everywhere but at home. Shaw: Now, sit down. Alex: He was He was traveling. He was interested in anything but what he referred to as 'playing Daddy.

Shaw became a heavy drinker. Sealed in their misery, they would remain unhappily married. Szell wanted the magic he thought only Robert Shaw could bring with the chorus.

Shaw craved Szell's command of the orchestra and his vast musical knowledge. Szell: The phrasing.

Pierce: Szell and Shaw were temperamental opposites. Szell was controlling and authoritarian. Shaw was emotional and intuitive.

Szell: Two punto fortissimos back from the double bar. Shaw: We were antagonistic reasonably early. I should've learned from him an awful lot more than I did.

Woods: Szell was tough on him. He'd eat you alive. There were a lot of mayors that didn't know we integrated their hotels, too.

They were outraged. Shaw: We never canceled a concert or we never changed personnel. In some respects, we led that crusade in the arts.

The heart of Atlanta's arts community was gone. Pierce: City leaders committed to building a new symphony hall. Now, all they needed was a new music director.

King: Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia. Head: We had no home. We rehearsed wherever we could find a place. We rehearsed at Spring Street School.

We rehearsed a full year in the locker room of the Braves, [laughing] so. Head: He would give money to people to buy instruments. He would give money to people to maybe study some more.

Woods: What was Shaw's preparation process for any performance? Anderson: In fact, he championed not only African American composers.

He championed American composers, in general. I think the issue is really not race, but music, with Shaw. Head: Every concert had a Charles Ives piece on it.

Ticket sales were terrible. Pierce: A grassroots movement arose to keep Shaw in Atlanta. Man: We've sold over 1, season ticket seats in the last two days.

It was a lot of storming out of chorus rehearsals. Kopleff: He could be a You could get absolutely with him. When Shaw heard of her divorce, he wasted no time.

Hitz: It was just like Tarzan and Jane, you know? He helped raise her son Alex and became a father again at 60 when Thomas was born.

It's made an extraordinary difference in my whole capacity to help other people. He was a great conductor, by any measure. Abbott: I think we were all on edge.

Going into East Berlin was not anything most of us had experienced. Head: So we go to Checkpoint Charlie.

They took our passports, which, I didn't feel real good about that. It was a packed concert hall and we got to perform the Beethoven '9th.

The orchestra is wonderful, everything. I mean, tears. I said to myself, 'I have to look away. If I see this, I won't be able to play a note.

Not just me. My fellow singers were weeping. The audience was weeping. You could not keep us from that.

I don't think we nor did we think we were capable of it. Um -- They didn't. Head: [crying] It was just unreal. Never experienced anything like it in my life, and haven't since.

Head: Went downstairs, changed clothes.

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